Feature Slides

NITRD 20th Anniversary Symposium

NITRD 20th Anniversary Symposium

The Knight Conference Center, Newseum, Washington D.C.

February 16, 2012




HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: THE TREE AND THE FRUIT

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Summary

In the last 20 years:

In the years ahead:

Ultimately, the U.S. innovation ecosystem — spanning government, industry, and academia — makes advances in supercomputing possible, and provides the U.S. with significant advantages over other nations.



Bio

David Keyes, formerly the Fu Foundation Chair of Applied Mathematics at Columbia University, is the inaugural dean of the Mathematical and Computer Sciences and Engineering Division at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. With backgrounds in engineering, applied mathematics, and computer science, Dr. Keyes works at the algorithmic interface between parallel computing and the numerical analysis of partial differential equations, across a variety of applications. Newton-Krylov-Schwarz parallel implicit methods, introduced in a 1993 paper, are now widely used throughout computational physics and engineering and scale to the edge of today's distributed memory multiprocessors. Dr. Keyes, who earned a B.S.E. in Mechanical Engineering at Princeton and a Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics at Harvard, is a former NSF Graduate Research Fellow and Presidential Young Investigator grantee, a Fellow of Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), and has been awarded ACM's Gordon Bell Prize and IEEE's Sidney Fernbach Prize. He has edited several US federal agency reports on high performance computing and has served on the advisory committees of the Office of CyberInfrastructure and the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Directorate of NSF. In 2011, SIAM awarded Dr. Keyes its Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession for his leadership and advocacy of high performance computing in science and engineering.